SONGS I LIKE BY ARTISTS I DON’T- THE SPIRIT OF RADIO’- RUSH

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Songs I like by Artists I Don’t- ‘The Spirit Of  Radio”- Rush. I have always wanted to like Rush. The band always seemed to me like they were great guys- and I have listened to them and they are outstanding musicians. I just can’t get by Geddy Lee’s voice. This is one of their songs I do like- The Spirit Of Radio  from their 1980 album Permanent Waves. The song was written by the three members of Rush- Neil Peart, Getty Lee and Alex Lifeson. Released as a single it went to #51 on the US Billboard Top 100. It peaked at #22 in their native Canada.  I was surprised when I looked it up that Rush has only had one Top 40 hit in their careers in the US- New World Man #21 in 1982.

From Songfacts-

Rush drummer and lyricist Neil Peart explained this song in an interview with Billboard magazine: “The Spirit of Radio was actually written as a tribute to all that was good about radio, celebrating my appreciation of magical moments I’d had since childhood, of hearing ‘the right song at the right time.’ However, [the song’s] celebration of the ideals of radio necessarily seemed like an attack on the reality – on the formulaic, mercenary programming of most radio stations, with music the last of anyone’s concerns. And yes, it was really ironic that such a song became popular on radio, though it was a kind of litmus test. Some radio guys who ‘got it’ could hear the song and think, ‘That’s the way it ought to be,’ while others – the shallow, swaggering salesmen-of-the-air – could be oblivious to the song’s meaning and proudly applaud themselves, ‘That’s about me!'”

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10 responses to “SONGS I LIKE BY ARTISTS I DON’T- THE SPIRIT OF RADIO’- RUSH

  1. Probably the last Rush album I liked when I was heavily into them. I’m pretty sure you can hear the 17 year old me in between songs on the Hammersmith Odeon live sets being a complete twat.
    I even read a couple of Ayn Rand books.
    I like those books of quotes (as an aside a review of Highlander II was “There should have been only one”).
    There is one to do with Ayn Rand and Tolkien by John Rogers that always makes me laugh.
    “There are two novels that can change a bookish fourteen-year old’s life: The Lord of the Rings and Atlas Shrugged. One is a childish fantasy that often engenders a lifelong obsession with its unbelievable heroes, leading to an emotionally stunted, socially crippled adulthood, unable to deal with the real world. The other, of course, involves orcs.”

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