BILLBOARD #1 HITS: #107: “HELLO, DOLLY”- LOUIS ARMSTRONG- MAY 9, 1964

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Billboard #1 Hits: #107: “Hello, Dolly”- Louis Armstrong. -May 9, 1964- #1 for 1 week.

  • Single: “Hello, Dolly”- Louis Armstrong
  • Record Company-Kapp
  • Genre: Pop, Jazz
  • Written by Jerry Herman
  • Time: 2:27
  • B-side: “A Lot Of Livin’ To Do”
  • Album- Hello, Dolly
  • Grade: A
  • Peaked at #1 1 week.

From the Broadway play “Hello, Dolly”- which also came out in 1964. Armstrong was out on the road when they called him in to do this song. He hated the song. He recorded it with his band and then went back on the road. He was out in the middle of the country a couple months later and for a couple nights on stage he started hearing “Hello, Dolly” being yelled from the audience. After a few nights he asked his bassist Arvell Shaw about it- and Shaw said “Remember that song you recorded a couple months ago?”- They sent a wire to New York for the music and lyrics to the song- learned it and started playing it to audiences to an overwhelming response. This would be the final hit in “Pops” career- and a big one- being the first artist to replace The Beatles at #1. Note- With ‘Hello,Dolly” Louis Armstrong became the oldest artist to hit #1 at 62 years and 279 days- 56 years later that record still stands. 2nd place is Cher at 52 years 297 days. Also the writer of “Hello, Dolly”- Jerry Herman just passed away in December at 88. “Hello, Dolly” won the Grammy for Song of the Year and Best Vocal Performance, Male.

3 responses to “BILLBOARD #1 HITS: #107: “HELLO, DOLLY”- LOUIS ARMSTRONG- MAY 9, 1964

  1. Excellent write-up on this song. I love that Louis Armstrong singing a Broadway show tune bumped The Beatles off the tops of the charts. I read somewhere that the banjo was a late addition to the arrangement and not to Armstrong’s liking either. Thanks for the post!

    • Its funny how many songs that turned out to be big hits for an artist- were sometimes not really liked by the artist. I know Louis didn’t think much of the song when he recorded it but I would imagine he grew to like it. He certainly put his mark on the song- no matter how many others cover it- the song will always be his.

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