QUARRYMEN MAKE VANITY RECORDING OF ‘THAT’LL BE THE DAY”/ “IN SPITE OF ALL THE DANGER”- JULY 14, 1958

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On this day in 1958 The Quarrymen featuring their frontman John Lennon, Paul McCartney, George Harrison, John Lowe and Colin Hanton went to a small studio in an electronics shop owned by Percy Phillips in Liverpool, England and made a vanity disc. The two songs they recorded were a cover of Buddy Holly’s “That’ll Be The Day” and an original “In Spite Of All The Danger” which was written by Quarrymen Paul McCartney and George Harrison.  It cost the boys 17 shillings and six pence. Only one copy was made and the deal was each band member could have possession of the disc for a week. Lowe was the last to have it and he had it for 25 years. Paul McCartney later bought it from Lowe. The original record in 2004 was named by Record Collector magazine as the most valuable record in existence.

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10 responses to “QUARRYMEN MAKE VANITY RECORDING OF ‘THAT’LL BE THE DAY”/ “IN SPITE OF ALL THE DANGER”- JULY 14, 1958

    • A pickup device is a transducer (specifically a variable reluctance sensor) that captures or senses mechanical vibrations produced by musical instruments, particularly stringed instruments such as the electric guitar, electric bass guitar, Chapman Stick, or electric violin, and converts them to an electrical signal that is amplified using an instrument amplifier (such as a guitar amplifier) to produce musical sounds through a loudspeaker in a speaker enclosure. The signal from a pickup can also be recorded directly, using a DI box (a common practice with the electric bass) or broadcast on the radio or television. Most electric guitars and electric basses use magnetic pickups. Acoustic guitars, upright basses and fiddles often use a piezoelectric pickup.

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