do something positive today

too much is made out of things that are wrong – most of the media has the motto ‘if it bleeds – it leads’. what does that say about us as a society? i am not a head in the sand person, nor do i believe that holding hands and singing kumbaya will solve issues of the day. i am happy to see that random acts of people doing kind things for their fellow man make news every once in a while, but honestly, it saddens me in a way that doing the right thing is being made newsworthy.

i read this story posted the other day from John Feinstein writing about Dean Smith. Feinstein was going to write a book about Smith with Smith’s cooperation, but unfortunately health issues have ended that.

here is the link to the story – http://www.washingtonpost.com/sports/colleges/memories-of-dean-smith-linger-even-as-his-memory-sadly-fails-him/2014/03/01/fade81c0-a0ae-11e3-b8d8-94577ff66b28_story.html

but here is the pertinent part of the story –

There’s one story that — to me — defines him. I’ve told it in the past, but it bears re-telling. In 1981, Smith very grudgingly agreed to cooperate with me on a profile for this newspaper. He kept insisting I should write about his players, but I said I had written about them. I wanted to write about him. He finally agreed.

One of the people I interviewed for the story was Rev. Robert Seymour, who had been Smith’s pastor at the Binkley Baptist Church since 1958, when he first arrived in Chapel Hill. Seymour told me a story about how upset Smith was to learn that Chapel Hill’s restaurants were still segregated. He and Seymour came up with an idea: Smith would walk into a restaurant with a black member of the church.

“You have to remember,” Reverend Seymour said. “Back then, he wasn’t Dean Smith. He was an assistant coach. Nothing more.”

Smith agreed and went to a restaurant where management knew him. He and his companion sat down and were served. That was the beginning of desegregation in Chapel Hill.

When I circled back to Smith and asked him to tell me more about that night, he shot me an angry look. “Who told you about that?” he asked.

“Reverend Seymour,” I said.

“I wish he hadn’t done that.”

“Why? You should be proud of doing something like that.”

He leaned forward in his chair and in a very quiet voice said something I’ve never forgotten: “You should never be proud of doing what’s right. You should just do what’s right.”

 

thats the thought for the day. hope that your day is blessed.

q

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